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TRADE OR OTHER NAMES: The active ingredient azadirachtin is found in commercial insect growth regulators. Some trade names for products containing azadirachtin include Align, Azatin and Turplex (231, 232). Formulations include a 10% plant extract (technical) and a 3% EC (232).

REGULATORY STATUS: Azadirachtin is registered in the United States as a general use pesticide with a toxicity classification of IV (relatively non-toxic). Check with specific state regulations for local restrictions which may apply. Products containing azadirachtin must bear the signal word "Caution" or "Warning" on their label (231).

CHEMICAL CLASS: Tetranortriterpenoid

INTRODUCTION: The key insecticidal ingredient found in the neem tree is azadirachtin, a naturally occurring substance that belongs to an organic molecule class called tetranortriterpenoids (236). It is structurally similar to insect hormones called "ecdysones," which control the process of metamorphosis as the insects pass from larva to pupa to adult. Metamorphosis requires the careful synchrony of many hormones and other physiological changes to be successful, and azadirachtin seems to be an "ecdysone blocker." It blocks the insect's production and release of these vital hormones. Insects then will not molt, thus breaking their life cycle (234, 235). Azadirachtin may also serve as a feeding deterrent for some insects. Depending on the stage of life-cycle, insect death may not occur for several days. However, upon ingestion of minute quantities, insects become quiescent and stop feeding. Residual insecticidal activity is evident for 7 to 10 days or longer, depending on insect and application rate (231, 232). Azadirachtin is used to control whiteflies, aphids, thrips, fungus gnats, caterpillars, beetles, mushroom flies, mealybugs, leafminers, gypsy moths and others on food, greenhouse crops, ornamentals and turf (232, 241).





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AgriDyne Technologies Inc.
2401 S. Foothill Dr.
Salt Lake City, Utah 84109


References for the information in this PIP can be found in Reference List Number 10

DISCLAIMER: The information in this profile does not in any way replace or supersede the information on the pesticide product label/ing or other regulatory requirements. Please refer to the pesticide product label/ing.